More new fish passes – at Burley Mills Weir and St Ann’s Mills Weir

St Anns Mills fish passTwo new fish passes have been opened at Burley Mills Weir and St Ann’s Mills Weir on the River Aire alongside Commercial Road in Kirkstall, Leeds.

The passes have been built by the Aire Rivers Trust in partnership with Leeds City Council and the Environment Agency.

The Burley Mills Fish Pass, located in attractive surroundings, can be seen from the public viewing point at the weir.

The £400,000 Kirkstall project was funded by Defra’s Catchment Restoration Fund which is administered by the Environment Agency. Leeds City Council will be taking ownership of the two fish passes.

The fish passes will enable the current fish populations of brown trout and coarse fish to move freely past the weirs to find the best places to feed, shelter, spawn and grow.

In the longer term the two fish passes will be a part of a chain which will allow salmon and sea trout to reach their historic spawning grounds upstream in Leeds, Bradford and the Craven District of North Yorkshire.

The weirs at Kirkstall have been a barrier to upstream movement of fish for around 200 years and the fish passes will not only improve fish stocks but will also improve the general ecology of the river.

Kevin Sunderland, Chairman of the Aire Rivers Trust, said that water quality improvements over the last 40 years have led to improved fish populations and this has meant that fish passes have become necessary to allow the river to reach its full potential. He also paid tribute to the help and co-operation which the Trust had received from various departments within Leeds Council and thanked the Environment Agency for providing the necessary funding and technical advice.

Neil Trudgill, Fisheries Technical Specialist at the Environment Agency said: “We are delighted to have worked with the Aire Rivers Trust on this project and congratulate the Trust on completing the project early and under budget.

“Angling is very popular in Leeds city centre and these passes will help improve our fish populations to benefit people and the environment. When fish are able to move freely up and down rivers, they are also less vulnerable to the occasional accidental pollution incidents that still occur in our rivers.”

[Environment Agency Press releases, this Press Release]

Fish in the River Aire

River Aire Fish 2012

Kevin Sunderland, our Chairman, had been busy. He has produced an excellent paper on fish populations in the River Aire. The latter part relates to each species of fish and where it can be found. The first part is a bit more general and may be of interest to those who aren’t particularly fish people.

An edited version of this report appeared in The Naturalist  No 138 (2013).

Rodley Weir and Fish Pass

Rodley Fish Pass Upstream View R Rodley Fish Pass EntranceI thought you might be interested to see these photos of Rodley Fish Pass now that it has been officially opened. Yorkshire Water and their consultants ARUP have done a good job on this. YW will be monitoring the efficiency of the pass by electronic tagging of some captured fish. The tags will then be traced and the fish followed through the pass by receiving devices on the posts at the side of the fish pass.

Brown trout are usually seen attempting (and failing) to ascend the Rodley Weir in October / November. If none are seen this year, it will mean that the fish are finding the pass, swimming up through it and bypassing the weir.

UPDATE

NEW ENVIRONMENTAL improvements have been completed to help save wildlife at a popular Leeds nature reserve.

The Rodley Weir bypass on the River Aire, close to Rodley Nature Reserve, has been designed to allow fish to swim around the weir and upstream so they can search for new habitats.

Previously, the weir formed a man-made barrier which prevented fish moving up the river.

Solar powered detectors around the site will also track the fish as they go through the new bypass.

The number of fish living in the River Aire has recently risen thanks to modern water treatment processes and better pollution controls.

The river is now home to a large number of salmon, trout, eels and lampreys.

Dave Nesham, trustee director of Rodley Nature Reserve, said: “We were delighted to work on such an important project.

“Anything that further improves biodiversity in the area can only be a good thing.”

Mr Nesham added: “We’ll be taking accompanied tours down to see the pass, with the hope being that we’ll see plenty of fish using it.”

The work was carried out earlier this year by Yorkshire Water’s partner MMB.

The river bypass work was supported by a grant from the Environment Agency.

Neil Trudgill, from the Environment Agency, said: “The fish bypass at Rodley is an essential step in the recovery of the river’s fish populations.

“The naturalised design will provide a passage around the weir as well as a habitat in which fish and other aquatic life can actually live, feed and grow.”

Angling, Streams and Fly tying exhibition at Bracken Hall Countryside Centre

Bracken Hall Countryside Centre and Museum (link to website) run by Bradford Museums service has an exhibition on rivers, streams and the art of fly tying in association with a handful of local fly tyers. The subject matter of this exhibition often comes up in fly dressing courses organised by fly dressers guild branches, salmon and trout association local branch meetings or adult education night school courses. And will be of special interest to anglers interested in learning to tie their own flies.
This exhibition runs until 29 April

Bracken Hall Countryside Centre,
Glen Road,
Baildon,
Shipley,
West Yorkshire,
BD17 5EA

telephone/fax: 01274 584140
email: brackenhallcc@btconnect.com

centre opening times

January – March
Wednesday & Sunday only 12 noon – 5pm
April
Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday only 12 noon – 5pm

The centre also runs walks and has a regular education program with many schools using the centre.

Rodley Nature Reserve

Hi,

I thought you might find this of interest. If you have not been to the reserve I can thouroughly reccomend it for a weekend stroll around the reserve and along the banks of the river, finishing off with a nice cuppa in the reserve office.

Regards,

Mark

Rodley Nature Reserve Press Article

Rodley Nature reserve is on the site of a small former waste water processing plant (sewage works) – today only a pumping station remains active ((water formerly arriving there is now pumped to a larger plant)) the remainder of the site is the nature reserve.
More information on their website

Skelton Grange Environment Centre open day 10 September 2011

You may be interested in this BTCV ((originally British Trust for Conservation Volunteers)) event at the Skelton Grange Environment
Centre – on our east Leeds water corridor

The annual Skelton Grange Environment Centre Open Day is taking place on 10th September 2011 11am-4pm.

There will be loads going on at our beautiful nature reserve in south Leeds, with green woodworking crafts, charcoal burning, nature trails, storytelling, music, circus skills, pizzas from our wood fired cob oven, a superb cafe with all sorts of cakes and other goodies – and much more!

There is a leaflet attached to this email, and more details including information of how to find us at http://www.skeltongrange.org.uk/friends/open_day.html

Skelton Grange open day

original information from

Rachel Clunas
Aire Action Leeds Project Officer
Fearns Wharf, Neptune Street, Leeds, LS9 8PB
T 0113 281 6804 M 07917 780 151
rachel.clunas@aireactionleeds.org.uk

www.britishwaterways.co.uk | www.environment-agency.co.uk
www.leeds.gov.uk | www.yorkshirewater.co.uk

2011 River cleanup in Shipley/Baildon area

River Aire cleanup Shipley-Baildon
Image ©Newsquest Bradford Telegraph & Argus ((clickable to their report)).
Here in the link below is a powerpoint presentation in Powerpoint 97-2004 format ((not the latest MS Office 2010 version – Powerpoint 97 is 2 versions older)) which should be playable using the Powerpoint player downloadable from Microsoft, if you don’t have MS-Office.

{filelink=4}

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River Aire clean up Shipley/Baildon area – June/July 2011.
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The presentation was prepared by Bradford Council covering cleanup work done in conjunction with the Environment Agency, West Yorkshire Probation Trust/(Community PaybackJustice Seen|Justice Done), Network Rail upgrading the fencing and InCommunities, with Bradford Council disposing of the debris and rubbish taken from the river.

In addition to Powerpoint It should also be playable+ ((+ no guarantees I don’t have a iPhone/iPad touch – I use a Mac, but can run Windows using Bootcamp|virtualisation)) using Keynote ((Mac App Store for Mac/iPhone/iPad+ users)), OpenOffice ((OpenOffice is free for Windows/Mac/Linux/Unix users)), LibreOffice ((LibreOffice is free for Windows/Mac/Linux/Unix users)) or NeoOffice ((NeoOffice is DonationWare for Mac users))· ((free/donation office suites for those who don’t want to/can’t run/afford MS-Office))