Chub, chub and yet more chub!

For the fisherpeople in our midst – from the Telegraph & Argus:

http://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/sport/10525816.Angling_Lines/

KEIGHLEY AC

Last week’s River Aire competition, organised by our club, produced a string of fine performances as anglers tested their skills in low water levels.

Steve North weighed in with 12 chub, two trout and a perch to win the evening match. Although the winning margin was only 1lb, it was enough to earn him top spot and the £25 first prize. Robin Pickles and Mick Metcalfe tied for second place. The Aire continues to fish well, with reports of large numbers of brown trout and grayling being caught on mixed maggot. The club are encouraged by barbel beginning to show in the river, indicating the success of a targeted restocking programme conducted jointly with the Environment Agency over recent years. Canal fishing is also proving popular. One club member netted a 7lb bream near Silsden. Roach and skimmers have also been taken in good numbers by anglers using poles baited with maggot. A five-hour open match will take place on Sunday at Silsden. Competitors are asked to meet at Silsden Bridge at 8.45am. Call match secretary Darren Watson on 07795-243332 for details.

BRADFORD No1 AA

Mirfield’s Paul Clark won the first round of this year’s Calder League with 36lb 6oz of chub on stick float and maggot. Andy Bradley (Gomersal) caught 24lb 14oz of chub and grayling from Cornmill for second, followed by Ultimate Barnsley’s Keith Hobson (21lb 15oz) at Lillands, Gomersal’s Dave Taylor (20lb 4oz) and Ian Fieldhouse (20lb 3oz). Ultimate Barnsley were the winning team on the day. The next round is on Sunday, July 21. Gratrix Dam is fishing well for quality chub and ide on maggot. The River Calder at Lillands and Gravel Pits is worth a visit for chub, grayling and trout. Chellow Dene is fishing well for chub, bream and roach on waggler and bread or maggot. Raskelf will be closed on Saturday for the second junior match of the year. It will also be closed on Sunday for a veterans’ match. Maunby on the River Swale will be closed on Sunday for a members’ match.

LISTERHILLS AA

All nets should be thoroughly dry after each angling session to eliminate the possibility of spreading any fish disease. For Sunday’s match at Pilley’s, the gate will be open at 8.30am for the draw at 8.45am. Work to improve the bankside at this water is ongoing thanks to a small number of members.

BINGLEY AC

We will have a small stand at Bingley show on Saturday, July 20 and members will be on hand to answer any questions about the club. The Wharfe is fishing well for barbel and chub. Coppice is also giving good nets of tench.

Editors Note: (link corrections, adding note and another link)
The full column (and previous weeks columns) can be seen online on the Telegraph and Argus Website It is published with a submissions deadline of Thursday noon, so can appear any time after that, usually before Midnight and appears in the Friday Print editions of the T&A.

Friends of Bradford Beck make progress with work on historic waterway

Bradford NeckConservationists says signs are good for Bradford Beck as they continue a campaign to cover up outdated danger warnings that tell people to keep away from the dirty water.

Volunteers with Friends of Bradford Beck are determined to expose the beck with their new ‘This Is Bradford Beck’ signs as a pleasant place to meander and enjoy.

Once deemed the filthiest river in England, they say with a little help from them and funding agencies, it could become attractive and healthy again.

This Sunday, the Friends of Bradford Beck are throwing a ‘Becknic’ party from 2pm to 3pm under The Crag in Valley Road, Shipley, to raise awareness of the waterway as something to celebrate.

People can just go along and join in – all they need to do is bring their own food.

The Friends and partner groups have come up with ambitious plans to clean up and improve the river, allowing wildlife to thrive and making it an asset to the city.

The beck’s water quality has been tested and come out “better than first expected”, said Steve Bland, of The Friends group.

The Friends have also been through the city to identify how and where the cleanliness and attractiveness of the watercourse for people and wildlife could be improved.

To make a start, volunteers have been holding action days clearing the areas of the beck and came up with the signing project.

They have been out and about covering up the old red warning signs dating back to the 1980s, if not earlier.

Mr Bland said: “When I was growing up those signs scared my mum. She always told us to stay away because we could catch something from the water but of course we didn’t stay away and we didn’t get ill from it either.

“The beck has pretty much been forgotten over the years. We want to reveal it again so it can be enjoyed and become an important part of the city again.”

Of the 11km of the beck which flows through the city, the majority is either hidden underground or forced to run through deep artificial culverts.

Many of these date back to the 19th century, when Bradford Beck was so polluted it was deemed the filthiest river in England, despite the city being at the time the country’s richest.

The culverts were built to hide the sight and smells of it. It runs beneath the Alhambra, City Hall, under the Westfield site and out on Canal Road to Shipley. The Friends are looking for funding to put up information boards, direction signs showing the way to the beck and possible marker flagstones or a painted line through the city centre charting its underground flow.

Thanks to the Telegraph and Argus for the publicity.

Plans for footpath changes at Apperley Bridge

Apperley Bridge footpath change will improve safety and view for walkers

According to The Wharfedale Observer News

A Horsforth councillor has backed plans to change the route of a footpath to make it safer and to improve the view for walkers.

Apperley Bridge

The plans will see an existing footpath close to Woodhouse Grove School in Apperley Bridge amended to make it safer for users by taking its route away from shared vehicle access and instead take it along the river Aire, improving the riverside views for walkers.

It will also add a total of 86 metres to the Leeds Country Way along the banks of the River Aire.

Councillor Dawn Collins said: “I am glad that, working with Bradford Council and Woodhouse Grove School, we are able to make this change.

“The current path begins in an area with shared vehicular access and, as a result, these changes will take walkers away from the threat posed by moving traffic.

“It is also pleasing that there will now be more attractive riverside views for walkers, hopefully making it a more popular route and increasing its usage by local people.

“Of course it will now have improved links to the Leeds Country Way so it will offer walkers in Horsforth better access to that route as well. I would also like to thank Woodhouse Grove School for their co-operation with this project.”

Where does your rod licence money go? Barbel in the Aire…

Barbel, aire, stocking

It is a question which I often hear from anglers when they cough up their hard-earned cash every year to pay for their fishing licence: “What does the Environment Agency do with the money?”

Apart from a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes, such as flood defence and pollution issues plus administration costs which receive very little publicity, one of their major projects is at Calverton in Nottinghamshire which is the home of a huge fish farm.

The main species bred there are barbel, chub and roach plus many other species and the resulting fish are used to replenish stocks all over the country.

The latest figures released by the Environment Agency show that over the past year more than 400,000 fish will have been released with our region, the North East, gaining the biggest share with 20 per cent of the haul, which works out at around 83,500 fish. The North West and Midlands both collected 15 per cent (63,000).

The numbers of the various species stocked were chub (91,000), barbel (67,000), roach (56,000), grayling (54,000), rudd (46,000), bream (39,000), tench (37,000) and dace (18,000).

I reported recently that the River Aire below Keighley and several other places down to Thwaites Mill in Leeds had had an influx of barbel in the eight- to-nine inch category and these were thriving for fish from an earlier stocking a few years ago are now in the four-pound class.

From an article in The Yorkshire Evening Post on 27 February 2013